Book Rundown, 2015

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This was a terrible year for reading. My average, until 2015 came along and ruined everything, was 98 books annually, but all I have to offer for this New Year’s Day recap is 19 books.

Some of this change was deliberate, to free up time for projects like getting a dog and writing some stuff of my own. Some of this change was because reading just doesn’t seem worth the effort when you’re depressed.

For this year’s Book Rundown, I’m taking a different approach and offering brief annotations for each book, because honestly there are only nineteen, this really shouldn’t take me long:

  1. Babbitt, Natalie. The Devil’s Storybook
    • This collection of short stories was a favorite when I was nine. Sometimes the devil gets his comeuppance, and sometimes he gets a fresh new soul. I read this for inspiration, though maybe I shouldn’t be admitting that.
  2. Beagle, Peter S. The Last Unicorn
    • A classic of fantasy literature, this is the story of a unicorn worried about species extinction. Beagle upends some common tropes, and I liked it well enough, but it didn’t have much emotional impact on me.
  3. Beckderf, Derf. Trashed
    • I loved Beckderf’s memoir about his high school classmate, My Friend Dahmer. This sophomore graphic novel, unfortunately, had very little plot. I liked learning about trash collection and disposal, but those tidbits weren’t enough to redeem the book. It would have worked better as a work of nonfiction.
  4. Bond, Rebecca. Escape from Baxters’ Barn
    • The reviews likening this children’s novel to Charlotte’s Web overstated the case, but it’s still a good story: an antisocial farm cat, upon discovering the farmers’ plot to burn their barn for insurance, sounds the alarm among an ensemble cast of animals. They scheme to escape their would-be death chamber, which seems fairly straightforward until you realize nobody has thumbs.
  5. Buehlman, Christopher. Between Two Fires
    • Chris (I can call him that; I totally got to meet him) never writes the same book twice. After debuting with a Southern Gothic werewolf novel, he wrote this medieval horror story about a battle between angels and demons, set against the backdrop of France during the plague.
  6. Buehlman, Christopher. The Lesser Dead
    • So then my pal Chris wrote a vampire book, this time with a setting in the sewers of 1970s New York. It reminded me, and I mean this sincerely, of Catcher in the Rye, only with more carnage.
  7. Butcher, Jim. Working for Bigfoot
    • Jim (I can call him that; I totally got to… actually that’s a story for another time) believes in Bigfoot the way Republicans believe in Reagan: passionately, with no tolerance for criticism. The three longish short stories in this collection are donut holes: not big enough to really satisfy you, but obviously you’re going to eat them anyway.
  8. Cohlene, Terri. Dancing Drum
    • This is a Cherokee  myth, presented as a children’s picture book, a format much more digestible than James Mooney’s seminal but dense History, Myths, and Sacred Formulas of the Cherokee People.
  9. Eichar, Donnie. Dead Mountain
    • I didn’t read a Russian novel this year — 2015 sucked, all right — but at least this work of investigative journalism is set in the Urals. Eichar presents a new theory to explain the gruesome fate of hikers who died in the Dyatlov Pass incident of 1959. I think he’s on to something, though he’s no great shakes as a writer–and I can only assume his copy editor died a similar horrible frozen death before she got around to his manuscript.
  10. King, Stephen. The Bazaar of Bad Dreams
    • For all his naysayers, I find King to be an impressive writer (HIS copy editors are clearly alive and well) and, in my opinion, a storyteller of the highest order. Though not his best collection of short stories, this book hit all the right chords: some stories were quirky, some were funny, some were high body count-y.
  11. King, Stephen. Finders Keepers
    • I read mysteries sparingly, but it’s Stephen King, you know? As the novel opens, an ardent fan steals the final, handwritten manuscript of a renowned writer (John Updike, for all intents and purposes). Decades later, the thief goes to retrieve his precious booty–but someone’s gotten there first.
  12. Maier, Corinne. Marx
    • I don’t remember reading this. It was a nonfiction graphic novel, that much rings a bell, but… well, it may have been good, but it wasn’t very memorable.
  13. McCloud, Scott. The Sculptor
    • A young sculptor, frustrated with his life and his art, makes a deal with Death: he will enjoy boundless artistic talent for the rest of his life, which now numbers 200 days and counting. It’s only after sealing the deal that our hero finally falls in love.
  14. Nicholas, Douglas. Throne of Darkness
    • In this medieval fantasy, book three of four in a series, my buddy Douglas (we’re Facebook friends. shut up.) pits a family of traveling musicians against evil shape-changers. Which makes it sound like a Scooby-Doo episode, which is terribly misleading. I love the dark atmosphere of these books, and the careful use of historical details, and the sense of horror, which is quiet and subtle–until suddenly it isn’t.
  15. Onion Magazine. The Iconic Covers
    • A collection of magazine covers from the only news source I trust.
  16. Parker, K. J. Savages
    • KJP, who finally revealed his real identity this year–hullo, Tom Holt–is indescribably good, and I do mean “indescribably.” Any attempt to summarize his books sounds dull (“Well, there are military tactics, see, and office clerks, and economic factions, and lots of details about government bureaucracies”) but he’s one of my must-reads.
  17. Sartre, Jean-Paul. Huis Clos
    • I read this just to get to the “Hell is other people” line. Totally worth it.
  18. Vandermeer, Jeff. Acceptance
    • The first work in this trilogy, Annihilation, was sublime. That’s the book writers should study when they’re learning to craft atmosphere. I read books two and three this year, and though I liked them, they just couldn’t match the creeping dread of the first.
  19. Vandermeer, Jeff. Authority
    • See above.

Previous, more impressive annual rundowns:

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One response »

  1. Pingback: Book rundown, 2016 | BookOuroboros

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